Pressure

How/Why - Check Your Tire Pressure

Here are five benefits to why you should take care of your tires.

    1. You can save money at the pump because of better rolling resistance.
    2. It’s better for the environment because they improve your car’s efficiency.
    3. Improves how your vehicle handles.
    4. Tires will last longer if they are well maintained.
    5. The most important it’s for your safety.

Below are typical wear patterns of under and over-inflated tires.
If you have a wear pattern that is different that these go to the
Wheel Alignment” section to see other wear patterns

Tires are measured in psi (pounds per square inch) or kilopascals(KPA). (In my shop and my videos I usually use psi.)
For every 10 degrees change in temperature, your tires could lose 1-2 psi per month.
So you should check your tires at least once a month and before a trip.
If you have TPMS (Tire Pressure Monitoring System) in your car then when your tire pressure is low you should have an indicator light (ex below) that should come up on your dash.
(We’ll cover TPMS in more detail in a later video/segment)

TPMS Symbol

Located on your dash. This symbol indicates that at least one of your tires is low.

The best time to check air pressure is when they are cold.
* First thing in the morning.
* Less than a mile after your vehicle has been driven.
* 3 hours after you’ve been driving.
You want to make sure they match the tire pressure that’s marked on the placard that’s easiest to find located on the drivers’ door jam or owners manual.


Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type null in /home/integratire/public_html/wp-content/plugins/wpb-elementor-addons/templates/content_box.php on line 942
You want to make sure they match the tire pressure that’s marked on the placard that’s easiest to find located on the drivers’ door jam or owners manual.

Inside Drivers Door

You want to make sure they match the tire pressure that’s marked on the placard that’s easiest to find located on the drivers’ door jam or owners manual.

Open your drivers door. Check inside

Air Pressure Front/Rear

Open your drivers door. Check inside

This is where you get the corredc=

Correct

This is where you get the corredc=


Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type null in /home/integratire/public_html/wp-content/plugins/wpb-elementor-addons/templates/content_box.php on line 942
Don’t use the marking you see on the side of the tire, which gives the maximum pressure. It’s not an ideal driving pressure.

Don't use

Don’t use the marking you see on the side of the tire, which gives the maximum pressure. It’s not an ideal driving pressure.

Time to take your Pressure

You will need a gauge.

Several Choices of gauges. Something to fit your budget. It’s a good idea to keep one in your glove compartment. Here are some examples below.

Stick/Pencil Gauge

Dial Gauge

Digital Gauge

1. Take the cap off (usually black/grey/silver) This will keep dirt/grime out.
If it’s a green cap that usually signifies the tire is filled with Nitrogen. I’ll cover that in another segment/video. 
For now, just know It’s safe to add air to the nitrogen-filled tire.
2. To check Press in the tire, put the pressure gauge over valve stem  (make sure there’s no hissing sound) 
Add/Subtract until you’ve matched the door spec.
To add you will need a compressor or go gas station or tire shop 
If you go over recommended air pressure use the nub on the back of the gauge to release some air.
3. Replace the cap. (if you’re missing a cap go to a tire shop)

*Don’t forget to check your spare. (Spare/Donut Tires will be covered in more detail in a later segment)

For now, go back to check your door placard again or owners manual for tire pressure and other specifics

A general rule of thumb for a donut spare:

  • Air pressure can typically be 60 psi (check the Placard again)
  • Don’t drive more than 80 km – 110 km (50-70 miles)
  • Don’t go faster than 80 km (50 miles) per hour before replacing your donut with a new 
  • Donut spares are designed to last 7 to 10 years if stored according to the tire makers’ recommendations. Exposure to sunlight and high heat reduces the tire’s life.
  • You should be aware that these tires have less traction than a traditional full-size tire